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For over 20 years, ESIP meetings have brought together the most innovative thinkers and leaders around Earth science data, thus forming a community dedicated to making Earth science data more discoverable, accessible and useful to researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and the public. The theme of this year’s meeting is "Data for All People: From Generation to Use and Understanding."

Draft schedule ONLY - times subject to change. REGISTER NOW HERE.

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Tuesday, January 18
 

11:00am EST

12:30pm EST

Break
Tuesday January 18, 2022 12:30pm - 1:30pm EST
TBA

1:30pm EST

AI-Ready Data: Draft Standard and Use Cases
The ESIP Data Readiness cluster has been working toward defining a community standard for AI-ready data. We surveyed AI and machine learning researchers about their data needs, and learned from similar efforts. Meanwhile, the NASA Earth Science Data System ML Training Data Interoperability Working Group has been working towards a community guideline on how to ensure the interoperability of training data for Earth science data. Both work will benefit from broad community contribution in this interactive session to further understand the current gap of AI-ready data.

This session will first present a first draft of the AI-ready data standard based on a recent community survey, defining the factors that are most important in determining AI-readiness for open datasets. Then we will feature three use cases representing different types of Earth science datasets. Each use case will showcase how data users prepare the datasets to ensure AI-readiness for model training and/or data reuse.

The session will conclude with a use-case driven discussion guided by the draft AI-ready data standard and training data interoperability guideline. The final goal of the session is to identify the next step for both groups to improve the community-driven standard and guideline that allows data providers/producers to improve the AI-readiness and training data interoperability via data stewardship and service/tool development. Such improvements are driven by the need of data users and will maximize the value of Earth science data for solving pressing societal challenges.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session: Review materials for the ESIP Data Readiness Cluster here: https://wiki.esipfed.org/Data_Readiness.

Organizers
avatar for Tyler Christensen

Tyler Christensen

Oceanographer, NOAA / National Ocean Service

Tuesday January 18, 2022 1:30pm - 3:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

1:30pm EST

Community Development for Open Science
Our session will focus on NASA-funded efforts to build an open science community. We will include speakers from NASA's open science efforts, ACCESS, MAAP, EOSDIS, and the ESDSWG.

Organizers
Tuesday January 18, 2022 1:30pm - 3:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

1:30pm EST

ESIP Short Course Materials: Development of recommendations and next steps
In 2012, ESIP’s Data Stewardship Committee produced a set of 34 related educational modules called the Data Management Short Course for Scientists (Short Course) targeted to research scientists on RDM and data stewardship related topics. These succinct educational modules were some of the first to be created in this topic area, and also the first put together to form a cohesive whole of modules under four key categories: The Case for Data Stewardship; Data Management Plans; Local Data Management; and Responsible Data Use. Data Science Education is a critical part of enabling Data for All People, both with respect to creation, use and understanding of data. As part of the innovation lifecycle, the Data Stewardship Committee has undertaken a process of reviewing these Short Course modules and this working session will discuss the outcomes of that review process, determine the status of the ESIP Short Course modules, and plan for future work that will maintain the currency, relevance and value of these resources. Future work may involve revising or deprecating the Short Course modules and filling gaps in topics either by the creation of new modules, or identifying other educational materials to recommend.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session: Visit the Short Courses in the ESIP Data Management Training Clearinghouse.

Organizers
avatar for Amber Budden

Amber Budden

Director for Learning and Outreach, NCEAS
Open science facilitator, community manager and data literacy trainer. I lead the NCEAS Learning Hub and short course activities and co-lead DataONE and the Arctic Data Center, with a focus on supporting the community in open science learning and practices... Read More →
avatar for Robert R. Downs

Robert R. Downs

Senior Digital Archivist, Columbia University
Dr. Robert R. Downs serves as the senior digital archivist and acting head of cyberinfrastructure and informatics research and development at CIESIN, the Center for International Earth Science Information Network, a research and data center of the Earth Institute of Columbia University... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Hoebelheinrich

Nancy Hoebelheinrich

Principal, Knowledge Motifs LLC
See my LinkedIn profile at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nancy-hoebelheinrich-0576ba3

Tuesday January 18, 2022 1:30pm - 3:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

1:30pm EST

Understanding Schema.org: Exploring its utility for research data on the web
In the world of metadata schemas, there is nothing new about schema.org. You'll find the same types of structures and properties as most other schemas for describing datasets. The usefulness of schema.org is not in its comprehensive coverage of the discipline or its implementation simplicity. Rather, it draws its usefulness from how it's delivered from one party to another. By embedding metadata into webpages, schema.org offers a solution to the social challenges of sharing and adopting common protocols for distribution and dissemination. Since almost all repositories have a website to describe these data, schema.org leverages this same delivery channel to provide structured metadata to the world. Websites with schema.org metadata headers are already being indexed by Google's Dataset Search and EarthCube's GeoCODES project. The schema.org cluster has drafted guidelines to help implementers describe scientific datasets in webpages. Because of the enthusiasm surrounding the guidelines, the cluster seeks to have the ESIP Assembly endorse these guidelines.

This session seeks to unite newcomers to schema.org with current adopters to share use case stories, examples of implementation successes, and discuss how schema.org can help address the FAIR principles. If you are looking to better understand schema.org, bring your questions and ideas as together we discover what schema.org can do for you.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session:
Review:
1) https://science-on-schema.org
2) https://github.com/ESIPFed/science-on-schema.org/blob/master/guides/Dataset.md

Organizers
avatar for Stephen Richard

Stephen Richard

Independent contractor, U. S. Geoscience Information Network
Stephen Richard is an independent contractor working from Tucson Arizona. He is currently involved in projects to implement a Geoscience ontology for the Loop3D project, the Technical Team for the EarthCube Office, and applications of geoscience vocabularies in AI applications. Interests... Read More →
avatar for Adam Shepherd

Adam Shepherd

Technical Director, BCO-DMO
Architecting adaptive and sustainable data infrastructures.Co-chair of the ESIP schema.org clusterKnowledge Graphs | Data Containerization | Declarative Workflows | Provenance | schema.org

Speakers
avatar for Doug Fils

Doug Fils

Ocean Leadership
Talk to me about anything...I really enjoy server side development (so I'd rather talk to UI developers) ;)I really enjoy semantics... but I like to mix that with unstructured dataso, talk to me about anything...
avatar for Andrea Thomer

Andrea Thomer

Assistant Professor, University of Michigan School of Information
I'm an information scientist interested in biodiversity and earth science informatics, natural history museum data, data curation, information organization, and computer-supported cooperative work! I'm looking for students!


Tuesday January 18, 2022 1:30pm - 3:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

3:15pm EST

Coffee Break Networking
Tuesday January 18, 2022 3:15pm - 3:45pm EST
TBA

4:00pm EST

Building Strong Communities Around Open Source Software & Open Science
As more and more software and science is done in public, the need to build and maintain strong communities around those projects is vital. Over the past year, ESDSWG Community Development has been research and working on a guide to help NASA ACCESS projects and the broader Earth Science community build better open communities.

This session would bring together speakers and the ESIP community to review current work and discuss other areas that should be highlighted in the guide. Projects like STAC and Pangeo thrive because they have broad community support, and other projects run by ESIP members could benefit from an open discussion on improving community outcomes (and open source/open science projects).



Organizers
SO

Steve Olding

ESDSWG Coordinator, ESDIS Project
avatar for Jeff Siarto

Jeff Siarto

Director of User Experience, NASA EED-2/Element 84

Tuesday January 18, 2022 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

4:00pm EST

How can COPDESS help advance the Interoperability and Reusability of Earth, Space, & Environmental Science Data?
Although FAIR has been around since 2016, we have not really progressed much beyond the ‘F’ and the ‘A': Volumes of data have been made Findable and Accessible, but the ‘I’ and the ‘R’ (Interoperable and Reusable) have barely been touched. Generic repositories such as Dryad, Mendeley, FigShare, and Zenodo, in their current format, do not provide domain specific data quality control and validation. Hence data stored in them are hard to reuse and to understand outside of the person/group that submitted the data. To aggregate data files from generic repositories, users have to spend nearly as much time validating and wrangling multiple files into a cohesive data set as they did without repositories. This leads to unnecessary duplication of the content of many individual files in multiple aggregated data sets and a huge duplication of effort.

Discipline specific efforts are emerging to try to agree on data best practices and standards within the Earth, Environmental, and Space Sciences, but these efforts are disconnected and are not harmonised. Further, few of these initiatives connect with higher level, discipline-agnostic issues of the FAIR/CARE/TRUST principles, agreed data citation practices, metrics, etc, which are essential if Earth, Environmental and Space science data is to contribute to major trans-disciplinary challenges such as the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals or the International Science Council/CODATA Decadal Program on Making Data Work for cross-domain Grand Challenges.

The Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth and Space Sciences (COPDESS) has the potential to guide and support discipline (or data) specific best practices for the “ I” and the “R” across the ESES community, whilst at the same time connecting them to developments in the broader research data/software/sample ecosystem.

This session will start to tease out ideas on how COPDESS can best focus its efforts to facilitate implementation of the ‘I’ and the ‘R’ to ensure that all data can be reused and understood for the benefit of all people. The session will also provide an update on the work being done in past ESIP COPDESS sessions on the workflow between publishers and repositories.

Organizers
BH

Brooks Hanson

American Geophysical Union
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

President, IGSN e.V.
Kerstin Lehnert is Doherty Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance that operates EarthChem, the System for Earth Sample Registration, and the Astromaterials Data System. Kerstin... Read More →
avatar for Lesley Wyborn

Lesley Wyborn

Honorary Professor, Australian Research Data Commons

Speakers

Tuesday January 18, 2022 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout
  • Keywords Data Stewardship, Metadata, Semantics, Domain Standards
  • Collaboration Area Tags COPDESS
  • Target Audience This applies to anyone with data at ESIP: it particularly applies to those that are wanting to publish their data and want help to select the repository that will actually make their data FAIR, understood by all and capable of being used to meet the societal challenges of today and those of the future.

4:00pm EST

Public Questions vs Open Datasets in U.S. Federal Environmental Governance
The United States federal government makes available a great number of datasets around environmental governance. But how easy are these datasets to use in answering real questions from environmental justice advocates? Continuing from this summer’s session “Designing a Public Portal for Participatory Environmental Governance”, participants will engage with questions from various environmental justice stakeholders and advocacy groups, attempting to map questions to public datasets using tools provided & researched through the ESIP Lab-funded project “Developing an Environmental Enforcement Data Portal for Grassroots and Congressional Action” and their own savvy and ingenuity.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session: Newcomers are welcome to participate. Prior work in this space can be seen at environmentalenforcementwatch.org and https://github.com/ESIPFed/Environmental-Enforcement-Watch.

Organizers
avatar for Kelsey Breseman

Kelsey Breseman

Archiving Program Lead, Environmental Data & Governance Initiative
Governmental accountability around public data & the environment. Decentralized web. Intersection of tech & ethics & civics.

Tuesday January 18, 2022 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

4:00pm EST

Towards an Earth and Space Sciences Knowledge Commons
Our technological and physical expansion into space exemplifies the growing interconnections between Earth and the space environment. The inseparability of the space environment from Earth and life on it reveals cracks and inadequacies in our data and knowledge infrastructure to integrate the different domains. The key to a flourishing community of Earth and space research is in improved knowledge systems (ways of representing our information).

The problem of our outdated data systems is not one of information, but of access. Datasets, disciplines, people, projects, institutions are all siloed, resulting in a lack of awareness and usability across silos that make reuse and collective progress impossible. Yet our increasing awareness of complexity has revealed that the distinctions between the silos are artificial, with each new bit of information further revealing the interconnectedness that pervades our world. As John Muir observed, “When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe.”

We will highlight important active efforts toward improved knowledge representation systems across the Earth and Space Sciences, emphasizing the importance of thinking in graphs/networks, and spark a discussion toward a framework to address the asymmetries: a knowledge commons [McGranaghan et al., 2021].

A knowledge commons is a combination of intelligent information representation and the openness, governance, and trust required to create a participatory ecosystem whereby the whole community maintains and evolves this shared information space. A knowledge commons is predicated on a central movement from a data society to a knowledge and wisdom society.

A knowledge commons is a core ‘technology’ (defined to include both hardware/software and cultural technologies) of the solution for a more inclusive, open, and equitable space community. In this participatory ecosystem, the whole community maintains and evolves the shared space. We believe that the path towards creating this commons lies in an embrace of radical collaboration, new scales of interaction, and the corresponding changes (in thinking, in community structure, and in support) that must accompany this movement.

A group that cuts across NASA, the American Geophysical Union, the MIT Knowledge Futures Group, industry, and academia have been actively exploring the concept of an Earth and Space Data Knowledge Commons, a collection of software and systems for improved information representation of space data and the platform and governance to make them collaborative, accessible, and equitable. That group is animated to converge various pockets of progress across the community in discussion to shape the idea of a knowledge commons, to feature and connect active projects that will help emerge the dimensions of the data that need to be captured, and to cultivate a community of practice to advance the concept.

McGranaghan, R., Klein, S. J., Cameron, A., Young, E., Schonfeld, S., Higginson, A., … Thompson, B. (2021). The need for a Space Data Knowledge Commons. Structuring Collective Knowledge. Retrieved from https://knowledgestructure.pubpub.org/pub/space-knowledge-commons

*Relationship to the theme of “Data for All People: From Data Generation to Data Use and Understanding:"*
We believe that there is increasing awareness for knowledge graphs, yet a lack of understanding for how to build them and, perhaps more importantly, how to link them into knowledge networks and to address the cultural components (e.g., trust and governance) for how to help these systems flourish. The concept of the knowledge commons goes beyond the technological needs of linking data to understand how people interact with the data, share and collectively manage the resource, and use the technology to interact with one another. It is timely to the focus on data for people that will guide the ESIP 2022 Winter Meeting.

Organizers
AC

Agnes Cameron

Knowledge Futures Group
avatar for Caroline Coward

Caroline Coward

Library Group Supervisor, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Assistant Director, Data Stewardship, American Geophysical Union (AGU)
avatar for SJ Klein

SJ Klein

Interlacer, the Underlay Project

Tuesday January 18, 2022 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

5:30pm EST

Break
Tuesday January 18, 2022 5:30pm - 6:00pm EST
TBA

6:00pm EST

Happy Hour
Tuesday January 18, 2022 6:00pm - 7:30pm EST
TBA
 
Wednesday, January 19
 

11:00am EST

Applying Use Cases to the Biological Data Standards Primer
The ESIP Biological Data Standards Cluster has been working on a primer for data managers new to biological data standards. After several rounds of community feedback, the cluster chose to share an initial version that was published to the ESIP Figshare (https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.16806712). Now that the primer is available, the cluster is beginning to look at use cases associated with the primer to help us determine 1) What questions come up when you work through the primer? 2) How can we help people using the primer? 3) What next steps become evident?

We would like to use our time together to share and add to use cases for the primer with the broader ESIP community to improve its utility and expand its usability.

How to prepare for this session:
1. Review the primer infographic, with an eye towards identifying gaps that can be filled in an upcoming version of the product.
2. Consider how your current biological data workflows make use of (or don’t make use of) the tools and techniques suggested in the primer.
3. If you have any datasets that you think would be relevant for a case study, please contact the organizers

Organizers
avatar for Abby Benson

Abby Benson

Biologist, U.S. Geological Survey
DL

Diana LaScala-Gruenewald

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
avatar for Robert McGuinn

Robert McGuinn

Conservation Biologist / Data Systems Manager, NOAA/NCEI/Northern Gulf Institute
Robert McGuinn is a Research Program Manager at the Northern Gulf Institute, a NOAA Cooperative Institute which is affiliated with the National Centers for Environmental Information in Stennis, Mississippi. He is also the Data Systems Manager for the National Marine Fisheries Service's... Read More →
avatar for Erin Satterthwaite

Erin Satterthwaite

California Sea Grant & Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Marine ecology | International coordination | Ocean observations | Diverse engagement | Food | Surfing | Backpacking | Biking

Wednesday January 19, 2022 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

11:00am EST

Improving "FAIRness" and "Fairness" of AI/ML in Geoscience
Many scientists are actively experimenting AI/ML methods to either replace the conventional methods or improving the existing data products to higher accuracy and resolution. However, most people complains that the experiments reported in research literature are very difficult to neither reproduce nor reuse. The source code and notebooks and associated data, models, and results are hard to find, access, interoperate, and reuse. Meanwhile, the trained models are often biased towards the majority and common patterns due to sampling strategy or natural distribution. These issues are significantly harming the usability and trustworthy of AI/ML in geoscientific application. This session aims to solicit community experiences, opinion, and vision to enhance the FAIRness and fairness of AI/ML.

Organizers
avatar for Ziheng Sun

Ziheng Sun

Research Assistant Professor, George Mason University
My research interests are mainly on geospatial cyberinfrastructure and machine learning in atmospheric and agricultural sciences.

Speakers

Wednesday January 19, 2022 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

11:00am EST

Is the Earth Science Data Management Community Ready For Usage Based Discovery?
Usage Based Discovery (UBD) is a new paradigm for dataset discovery that depends on the broad implementation of open science best practices across a variety of Earth Sciences domains. Scientific journals and other research outlets promote the reproducibility of research results by exposing the data that were used to create scientific analyses and data products. Over the past three ESIP federation meetings, our cluster has held hackathons focused on harvesting dataset usage relations from these sources. The Cluster has also collaborated on a graph based data discovery and visualization framework to expose the information that we have collected. These activities allowed us to explore and understand the UBD concept, and we think this new paradigm promises to improve the data management enterprise and reach a broader user base, thereby maximizing the benefit of the Earth Sciences to society.

Organizers
avatar for Jonathan Blythe

Jonathan Blythe

Data Manager, BOEM
avatar for Tyler Christensen

Tyler Christensen

Oceanographer, NOAA / National Ocean Service
avatar for Sara Lafia

Sara Lafia

Research Fellow, University of Michigan
@lafia_s

Speakers
avatar for Madison Langseth

Madison Langseth

U.S. Geological Survey


Wednesday January 19, 2022 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

11:00am EST

Understanding the Significance of the SBIR-STTR Program, Its Phases and Technologies, and How Your Organization Can Benefit
The federal government’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs are highly undervalued by the very agencies they were intended to benefit. SBIR-STTR programs can provide federal agencies with young but proven technologies that can be rapidly adopted to address agency goals and objectives…on a sole source basis. Established in 1982 (SBIR) and 1992 (STTR), these programs provide billions of dollars in competitive funding for high tech development by small businesses that could be tapped by more agencies and their contractors to promote innovation and rapid adoption of new technology.

SBIR Phase III contracts could be a valuable source of support for public-private collaboration and innovation in the ESIP community and could help ESIP increase private sector participation in its initiatives while making more data available for all people from Data Generation to Data Use and Understanding.

A key challenge, however, is that many agencies and federal contractors don’t understand the value that SBIR-STTR contracts and subcontracts can bring to the table, or the steps needed to access these resources. This session will identify specific SBIR examples and discuss the benefits and gaps that exist in the program that may be hampering their agency adoption. Opportunities exist for agencies that need to share their data, work across line offices, and use their data as strategic assets—as well as to meet their goals for diversity and equity in procurement. Diverse opportunities exist for small businesses as well as academic and nonprofit organizations that work with small businesses as subcontractors to access procurement opportunities that will scale up your work in high-impact applications. Come to this session to learn how you can take advantage of SBIR-STTR technologies and accelerate procurement opportunities for your organization and accelerate data-driven decision making!

You will leave this session with a clear understanding of how your agency, your non-profit, or your commercial enterprise can move forward immediately and engage SBIR Phase III-eligible small businesses as we work to rebuild our nation’s economy.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session: This session may be good to offer broad participation, perhaps as a 'come and experience ESIP' opportunity for free participation. It will be highly educational for agency representatives, non-profit leaders and commercial company leaders. In order to attract more people to come and join ESIP, perhaps this session could be that taste.

Organizers
avatar for Bob Chen

Bob Chen

Director & Senior Research Scientist, CIESIN/Columbia University
Environment and security applications, DANTE (Data ANalytics and Tools for Ecosecurity), the POPGRID Data Collaborative, TReNDS (Thematic Research Network on Data and Statistics), SEDAC (Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center), decision support, open data sharing (not just FAIR... Read More →
avatar for Dave Jones

Dave Jones

StormCenter Communications, StormCenter Communications
Real-time data access, sharing and collaboration across multiple platforms. Collaborative Common Operating Pictures, Decision Making, Situational Awareness, connecting disparate mapping systems to share data, cross-product data sharing and collaboration. SBIR Phase III status with... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Tom Parris

Tom Parris

President, ISciences LLC
Tom Parris has over 30 years of experience in the analysis of sustainability, vulnerability, and conflict using his skills in policy analysis, quantitative natural and social science, information science, remote sensing and geospatial analysis.


Wednesday January 19, 2022 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
TBA

12:45pm EST

Coffee Break Networking
Wednesday January 19, 2022 12:45pm - 1:15pm EST
TBA

1:30pm EST

Unearthing semantic web resources for ESIP communities
The need for common data standards and domain knowledge has reached a precipice. Across ESIP it is no different; ongoing, potentially disparate, conversations about data quality, resource discovery, and domain knowledge are prevalent and yet implicitly rely on a shared view or interpretation.

In this session we bring together members of several active ESIP clusters to share topics of interest, needs and gaps with respect to data standards and domain knowledge we endeavour to reuse in some human and machine readable format – e.g. controlled vocabularies, data models, thesauri, taxonomies, classifications, property graphs, ontologies etc.

The following questions, while not exhaustive, are indicative of relevant topics for discussion:
What has prompted the interest in data standards and/or semantics?
What is the goal?
What is currently available in the space and is it reusable?
Is the community making contributions to any resources?
Where are the gaps in knowledge, standards, or structure?

Organizers
avatar for Brandon Whitehead

Brandon Whitehead

environmental data scientist, Manaaki Whenua -- Landcare Research

Wednesday January 19, 2022 1:30pm - 3:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

1:30pm EST

Data on the Brink: Improving Data Access and Reusability Do-A-Thon
Data should be accessible and usable by those making or influencing decisions. Those who need the data - whether scientists, local officials, or the general public - often don’t have access to, or are unaware of, the data that they need to make appropriate, informed decisions.

Small groups of undaunted experts get things done. Today, there are countless underutilized datasets, and the level of Data Access and Reusability varies widely by region, scientific discipline, and medium. We need to learn and share how others have improved data access and reusability.

This Do-A-Thon aims to utilize our shared knowledge to improve access to and awareness of a small but diverse collection of scientific data, with the long term goal of capturing these processes to develop leading practices to improve data access and reusability. After a brief presentation of background work including some preliminary “responsibilities and rights” with respect to improving data access and reusability, the majority of the session will be spent sharing and applying processes that have improved data access and reusability. Candidate datasets may be suggested to the organizers prior to the session. However, work can proceed in more general terms even without candidate datasets.

While this session will build upon work done in other spaces, no prior experience is necessary to participate.

Here are some recommended ways to prepare for this session: Some work on improving data access and reusability has been shared before. A review of the presentations in the 2019 AGU eLightning session, Dirty Stories of Data Rescue, can help give a sense of the diverse efforts that are already taking place.

If you have improved access or reusability of a dataset, please come prepared to share your experience.

If you are aware of a candidate dataset that needs to improve access or reusability, please contact Denise Hills or Steve Diggs before January 10, 2022, so that we can incorporate that into the Do-A-Thon.

Most importantly, come prepared to honestly share the successes, the learning experiences, highlights, and frustrations that you have encountered in your data conservation efforts.

Organizers
avatar for Steve Diggs

Steve Diggs

Technical Director, CCHDO, Scripps Institution of Oceanography / UC San Diego
avatar for Denise Hills

Denise Hills

Director, Energy Investigations, Geological Survey of Alabama
Long tail data, data preservation, connecting physical samples to digital information, geoscience policy, science communication

Wednesday January 19, 2022 1:30pm - 4:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

1:30pm EST

In-situ and remotely-sensed data integration for wildfire management
The proposed session continues the synthesis of ideas contributed by individuals from various ESIP clusters (including Agriculture and Climate, Semantic Harmonization, EnviroSensing, Machine Learning, and Drones) applied to wildfire management. This session focuses on the challenge of ingesting heterogeneous data from in-situ and remotely-sensed systems into models and applications between the pre-fire and fire containment phases. Scenarios include (a) using heterogeneous data for better planning prescribed burns by using data before and after a burn for ingestion into fire behavior models, and (b) using heterogeneous data to recommend both strategic fuel break siting during pre-fire planning and optimal containment line location in the course of active wildfire fighting.

This synthesis session directly extends two of the key takeaways proposed by discussants during the 2021 ESIP summer meeting session “Identifying technology capabilities that meet wildfire science and practitioner requirements”: (a) “...improve fusion among near-term fire behavior model data, values-at-risk data, and sensor data that can be represented and visualized in a Common Operating Picture”, and (b) “...better estimate burn severity by fusing data from various sources (in-situ, remote, model)”.

Organizers
RA

Rustem Albayrak

Senior Software Engineer, ADNET (GESDISC)
avatar for Martha Apple

Martha Apple

Professor, Biological Sciences, Montana Technological University
Alpine Plant Ecology, Climate Change, and Environmental Sensing
avatar for Scotty Strachan

Scotty Strachan

Director of Cyberinfrastructure, University of Nevada, Reno
Institutional cyberinfrastructure, sensor-based science, mountain climate observatories!
avatar for Bill Teng

Bill Teng

NASA GES DISC (ADNET)
avatar for Brian Wee

Brian Wee

Founder and Managing Director, Massive Connections, LLC
Transdisciplinary scientist invested in the use of environmental data and information for science, education, and decision-making for challenges at the nexus of global environmental change, natural resources, and society. Strategized and executed initiatives to engage the US Congress... Read More →

Wednesday January 19, 2022 1:30pm - 4:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

1:30pm EST

Unlocking ARCO: Analysis-Ready Cloud-Optimized Data transformation in practice
Experience is the best teacher. Data providers need a space to share their experiences generating ARCO (analysis-ready cloud-optimized) datasets and use the ESIP Winter session to collect best practices and examples.

The Cloud Computing Cluster is excited to organize this session which will produce “real outputs” in the form of best practices, guidance and use case driven workflow with examples which will be formalized in github repositories and shared through social media such as LinkedIn, twitter and slack.

The Cloud Computing Cluster is composed of members from data and service providers such as USGS, NASA, NOAA, cloud providers such as AWS and Microsoft, and academic institutions such as UCAR/NCAR and the University of Washington. The January meeting provides an opportunity for these organizations to share and coalesce on best practices for analysis-ready cloud-optimized (ARCO) data.

Organizers
avatar for Aimee Barciauskas

Aimee Barciauskas

Data engineer, Development Seed
avatar for Rob Casey

Rob Casey

Deputy Director of Cyberinfrastructure, IRIS Data Services
Rob currently serves as Deputy Director of Cyberinfrastructure at the IncorporatedResearch Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC) in Seattle, WA. His responsibilities include management of software development and data services activities as well as leading... Read More →
avatar for Sudhir Shrestha

Sudhir Shrestha

Technical Director Web and Dissemination, NOAA NWS Office of Water Prediction

Wednesday January 19, 2022 1:30pm - 4:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout
  • Keywords Cloud Computing, Data Stewardship
  • Collaboration Area Tags Cloud Computing, Community Data
  • Target Audience The target audience is anyone who is interested in generating cloud-optimized data archives and/or has experience doing so. The cloud computing cluster is composed of data providers and technologists who have affiliations from federal agencies to academic institutions and share the mission of making Earth observation archives more accessible to a greater number of people. We believe creating more and better cloud-optimized data archives will make that possible.

3:00pm EST

Community Development of the SWEET semantic system for Earth and Environment Data - A Call for Interest
The Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (or SWEET) is a system, created at NASA JPL by the late Rob Raskin and colleagues, using a semantic web technology approach for working with Earth and environmental data. ESIP has been the steward of SWEET more recently, effectively responsible for SWEET. As a terminological system, SWEET is applicable and relevant for various disciplines from Earth science to library science to knowledge graphs and beyond.

This session will bring together anyone interested in SWEET, but aiming more specifically for those interested in positively developing SWEET.

At least two tracks are worth exploring.
One seeks to identify subject-matter experts of disciplines covered by SWEET terminology. The goal will be to determine if they are interested in
developing such things as definitions for those terms in SWEET, i.e., local SWEET definitions of SWEET terms. For example, oceanographers may be interested in developing SWEET oceanography content.
Similarly, ESIP marine clusters may wish to do so.

The benefit of this will be having a pool of potential contributors, and delegation of development tasks.
Additionally, by involving Earth science practitioners, SWEET can be developed to a greater degree of accuracy and quality.
The current SWEET vocabulary and conceptualization as expressed by its vocabulary and publications can be verified.

A second track will be to identify subject-matter experts to verify the accuracy of Wikidata definitions added to some of SWEETs vocabulary.

This session is relevant for the theme of 'Data for All People: From Data Generation to Data Use and Understanding' in the following manner.
SWEET is a vocabulary and semantic resource open to development for all people and Earth science and data communities. It can help with understanding data, and data use, particularly if further developed. In a collaborative development approach, it can reach more potential applications and persons from diverse backgrounds. Earth observation data is useful for all people across the lifecycle from collection or generation to use to understanding. This translates also to SWEET as a system that can terminologically and semantically support that data and knowledge base.

Organizers
avatar for Robert Rovetto

Robert Rovetto

Concept engineer. Aspriring student open to study and work opportunities
Knowledge modeler. Aspiring PhD student searching for opportunity. Aerospace terminologist. Formal ontologist.I develop conceptual models, ontologies, terminologies, and graph diagrams, with specialties in space, maritime, emergency response, highly abstract concepts, as well as... Read More →
avatar for Brandon Whitehead

Brandon Whitehead

environmental data scientist, Manaaki Whenua -- Landcare Research

Wednesday January 19, 2022 3:00pm - 4:00pm EST
TBA

4:00pm EST

Break
Wednesday January 19, 2022 4:00pm - 4:30pm EST
TBA

4:30pm EST

Research Showcase Poster & Demo Live Event
The Research Showcase features virtual posters and recorded demos and tutorials from ESIP Meeting Attendees. You can view all contributions at any time during the meeting and leave questions or comments for the contributors. LIVE Q&A: We encourage you to attend the live Research Showcase Session (Wednesday January 19th, 4:30-6 pm ET) to chat live with contributors.

Wednesday January 19, 2022 4:30pm - 6:00pm EST
TBA
 
Thursday, January 20
 

11:00am EST

12:30pm EST

Break
Thursday January 20, 2022 12:30pm - 1:30pm EST
TBA

1:30pm EST

Assessing the State of Community Knowledge Graphs
Within the ESIP community, there are a growing number of projects that use knowledge graphs (KG) to store, annotate, create, and share data. KGs are a potentially innovative way of working with data in an open and flexible way, but there are still a lot of open questions regarding their adoption within the earth sciences. In this session, we bring together some ESIP KG users and developers to discuss our varied approaches, challenges and goals in using knowledge graphs. The session will start with a very short description of knowledge graphs, and then feature lightning talks from our panelists. We’ll then open the panel up for general discussion. We’ll ask panelists questions like:

In which ESIP committees and clusters is your work discussed, if any?
Who do you see as your community?
What do you see as your use cases or competency questions for your resources?
Who do you wish you could connect to?
What are your thoughts on KG completion approaches (like them, hate them, etc)?
Do you do any validation of your graph resources? According to what criteria/standards/ontologies?
How do you discover connections of use for your community?
What does "governance" mean in your community
What is your sustainability model?
How do you balance organic development of the graph with the use of standards?
What do you see as the biggest challenges in this space? What are the biggest open research questions or engineering obstacles?

Session leaders Andrea Thomer and Doug Fils will moderate the discussion.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session: If attendees are not familiar with knowledge graphs, they might wish to skim the following chapter: https://arxiv.org/pdf/2003.02320.pdf 

Organizers
avatar for Doug Fils

Doug Fils

Ocean Leadership
Talk to me about anything...I really enjoy server side development (so I'd rather talk to UI developers) ;)I really enjoy semantics... but I like to mix that with unstructured dataso, talk to me about anything...
avatar for Andrea Thomer

Andrea Thomer

Assistant Professor, University of Michigan School of Information
I'm an information scientist interested in biodiversity and earth science informatics, natural history museum data, data curation, information organization, and computer-supported cooperative work! I'm looking for students!

Speakers
avatar for Sara Lafia

Sara Lafia

Research Fellow, University of Michigan
@lafia_s
avatar for Simon Goring

Simon Goring

University of Wisconsin - Madison
Simon Going is an Assistant Scientist in the Department of Geography at the University of Wisconsin - Madison and the outgoing Co-Chair of the earthCube Engagement Team/representative on the Leadership Council.
TN

Tom Narock

Goucher College
avatar for Dave Blodgett

Dave Blodgett

U.S. Geological Survey


Thursday January 20, 2022 1:30pm - 3:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

1:30pm EST

ESIP Cross-Domain Collaboration Laboratory -- Let’s Look at Wildfires
Global and local challenges are increasing from a rapidly changing climate that is fueling extreme events. As of September 1, 2021, the year-to-date total of weather and climate disaster events with losses exceeding $1 billion each across the U.S. stands at 18 and is four events shy of the 2020 record for the most disasters on record in a calendar year.

While the number of extreme events continues to increase, the impacts on people, communities, supply chains, transportation, communication and utility sectors also continue to grow due to aging critical infrastructure, increased vulnerabilities due to more demand from growing populations, and more people moving into hazard-prone areas that typically lack region-specific preparedness campaigns.

Data availability has also been increasing at logarithmic scales while the ability to discover, trust and use that data has lagged behind the ‘data availability’ growth rates. Non-technical decision makers, who crave trusted data that can be used to drive decision making, cannot find what they need, often due to the complex semantics of hazards and disasters. When they do find a relevant data source, they have to trust it in order to make a decision. Once they have gained trust in the source and used the data in their decision making processes, they are more than happy to provide feedback on the data.

This session will bring together members from the ESIP #DataReadiness, #Discovery, #InformationQuality, #SemanticHarmonization, #CommunityResilience, #Ag&Climate, #Envirosensing and #DisasterLifecycle clusters to engage in some active use case conversations, such as wildfire impacts on communities and the movement of fleet utility vehicles across the nation to restore power. We desire to leverage and grow a way to serve decision makers through lay language data discoverability and use to drive more rapid decisions. This could prove to be extremely valuable as we seek to cut the time between data discovery, trust and decision making.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session: Think about whether you have candidate data potentially applicable to wildfire disasters.

Organizers
avatar for Dave Jones

Dave Jones

StormCenter Communications, StormCenter Communications
Real-time data access, sharing and collaboration across multiple platforms. Collaborative Common Operating Pictures, Decision Making, Situational Awareness, connecting disparate mapping systems to share data, cross-product data sharing and collaboration. SBIR Phase III status with... Read More →
avatar for Karen Moe

Karen Moe

NASA Goddard Emeritus
ESIP Disasters Lifecycle cluster co-chair with Dave Jones/StormCenter IncManaging an air quality monitoring project for my town just outside of Washington DC and looking for free software!! Enjoying citizen science roles in environmental monitoring and sustainable practices in my... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Pier Luigi Buttigieg

Pier Luigi Buttigieg

Digital Knowledge Steward / Senior Data Scientist, Helmholtz Metadata Collaboration / GEOMAR
I research and develop advanced, operational-grade, and internationally adopted knowledge representation (KR) technologies for ecology, planetary science, and Sustainable Development. I apply these solutions in mobilising and analysing complex and high-dimensional data sets, while... Read More →


Thursday January 20, 2022 1:30pm - 3:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

1:30pm EST

Recent advancements in marine data management: From ‘omics to imaging and beyond.
As a collaboration between the Marine Data Cluster and the Biological Data Standards Cluster this session will bring together a collection of presenters to discuss recent advancements in marine data management. Building off this year’s theme of Data for All People: From Data Generation to Data Use and Understanding we will showcase innovative and time-tested techniques for managing the heterogeneous observations of the world's oceans. This session will feature a series of lightning talks on the various approaches followed by open discussion on potential collaborations and overlap.

Organizers
avatar for Mathew Biddle

Mathew Biddle

Data Management Analyst, IOOS/ISS

Speakers
DL

Diana LaScala-Gruenewald

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
avatar for Stace Beaulieu

Stace Beaulieu

ESIP rep for WHOI, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
I'm the Information Manager for the Northeast U.S. Shelf LTER (https://nes-lter.whoi.edu/) and Coordinator for WHOI's Ocean Informatics Working Group (https://www.whoi.edu/ocean-informatics). Come talk with me about data science training in the ocean sciences!


Thursday January 20, 2022 1:30pm - 3:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

1:30pm EST

Sustaining Community Repository Networks: Lessons Learned and Steps Moving Forward
Data repositories confront multiple challenges: building a robust community around their content, features, and use, defining their position within a rapidly growing ecosystem of repositories, weighing the costs and benefits of participating in one or more repository networks, and developing a funding model that can support all of these (and more) critical areas of work. Similarly, community repository networks enable efficient discovery and access to resources shared by member repositories while promoting interoperability and efficiency, but also must confront similar challenges in defining who their community is, developing and communicating the value proposition that the network provides, promoting the value of the network, both to its members and to users of the network's repositories and the services provided by the network as a whole, and developing a funding model that both supports the network as an entity above and beyond the support provided by the member repositories.

This session will bring together a group of panelists from the repository and repository network perspective to seed and participate in a community discussion around:
* Defining what sustainability means in the context of repository networks as compared to repositories themselves
* Successful and unsuccessful models for sustaining repository networks
* Specific examples of sustainability strategies from both the panelists and attendees of the session
* The role of sponsoring agencies in contributing to repository and network sustainability
* Different sustainability challenges faced by repositories and networks:
* Disciplinary differences in value and use
* Cost and complexity variation in repository needs
* Differences in realistic funding models
* How has the sustainability landscape shifted over the past 10-20 years? How do we anticipate it will continue to change over the coming decades?

Organizers
avatar for Karl Benedict

Karl Benedict

Director of Research Data Services & Information Technology, University of New Mexico
Since 1986 I have had parallel careers in Information Technology, Data Management and Analysis, and Archaeology. Since 1993 when I arrived at UNM I have worked as a Graduate Student in Anthropology, Research Scientist, Research Faculty, Applied Research Center Director, and currently... Read More →
avatar for Matt Jones

Matt Jones

Director, DataONE Program, DataONE, UC Santa Barbara
DataONE | Arctic Data Center | Open Science | Provenance and Semantics | Scientific Synthesis

Speakers
avatar for Amber Budden

Amber Budden

Director for Learning and Outreach, NCEAS
Open science facilitator, community manager and data literacy trainer. I lead the NCEAS Learning Hub and short course activities and co-lead DataONE and the Arctic Data Center, with a focus on supporting the community in open science learning and practices... Read More →
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

President, IGSN e.V.
Kerstin Lehnert is Doherty Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance that operates EarthChem, the System for Earth Sample Registration, and the Astromaterials Data System. Kerstin... Read More →
avatar for Christine Kirkpatrick

Christine Kirkpatrick

Division Director, Research Data Services, San Diego Supercomputer Center, UC San Diego


Thursday January 20, 2022 1:30pm - 3:00pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

3:15pm EST

Coffee Break Networking
Thursday January 20, 2022 3:15pm - 3:45pm EST
TBA

4:00pm EST

A Framework for Knowledge Organization and Modeling of Astronomy and near-Earth Space Activities
The near-Earth space environment is seeing a great increase in activity as more and more nations and organizations engage in spaceflight and astronomical endeavors. This translates to a growing wealth of data, information and knowledge that we can tap for current generations and posterity. Interdisciplinary techniques and diverse perspectives can be applied to leverage that content: for knowledge organization, knowledge representation and reasoning (KRR in AI, artificial intelligence), knowledge management, knowledge discovery; as well as data search, retrieval, modeling, etc. Two example techniques are creating knowledge organization systems such as terminologies and thesauri; and more complex systems in KRR and knowledge modeling, creating ontologies [Rovetto, International Astronautical Congress 2017].

This session aims to bring together persons and organizations interested in space data, broadly construed to include astronomy, astronautics, and other space-related topics.
It aims to identify means to organize space data, as well as knowledge representation and reasoning for space data and topics. This may result in concepts for an international space data system [Rovetto, AMOS conference, 2016] for the global community, if not for specific communities. An example is the space ontology and knowledge modeling project [Rovetto, https://purl.org/space-ontology] that aims to support knowledge discovery, sharing, and modeling for specific Earth-impacting activities such as space debris [Rovetto, Earth Science Informatics, 2015], spaceflight observations and operations [Rovetto, & Kelso, 2016][Rovetto, 2020, 2021] and astronomical phenomena.

This session is relevant for the theme of 'Data for All People: From Data Generation to Data Use and Understanding' in various ways.
First, trust in data is very pertinent for the domain of space. In particular, the spaceflight (or astronautics) community has historically been a governmental or military domain, where in security and trust are critical. Yet, where trust among spacefaring nations may be difficult.
For example, spaceflight data about artificial satellites is typically highly sensitive and may be of a national security nature.
This session proposal, therefore, can include calls for ideas about how to facilitate and create trust in that and other space communities. This may touch on AI techniques, social aspects, etc.
Second, the benefit of spaceflight activities has long been known to reach--at least in potential--to all people on Earth. The International Space Station is a paradigm example. In more recent times, some organizations ambitiously aim to have fleets of orbiting spacecraft provide services to the entire globe. This simultaneous means a promulgation of both data and space-based objects.
By bringing together persons interested in space activities and space data from astronomy to astronautics, we can better identify avenues to cooperate, innovate and potentially share data, information and knowledge.
Benefits are far-reaching, involving Earth observation, e.g., weather and environmental data; technological spinoffs; biological and medical experimentation; and scientific discovery via astronomical observations, e.g., stellar physics, observations of the sun; origins of Earth and planetary evolution; etc.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session: Please see these links:
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search?q=rovetto (works in NASA NTRS) and
https://purl.org/space-ontology (project vision site) and https://ontospace.wordpress.com/publications (relevant articles to date) and
https://amostech.com/TechnicalPapers/2016/Poster/Rovetto.pdf (example paper about the vision of an international framework using the authors in-progress ontologies) and
https://wiki.esipfed.org/File:ROVETTO.pdf (ESIP Funding Friday) and
https://github.com/rrovetto

Organizers
avatar for Robert Rovetto

Robert Rovetto

Concept engineer. Aspriring student open to study and work opportunities
Knowledge modeler. Aspiring PhD student searching for opportunity. Aerospace terminologist. Formal ontologist.I develop conceptual models, ontologies, terminologies, and graph diagrams, with specialties in space, maritime, emergency response, highly abstract concepts, as well as... Read More →

Thursday January 20, 2022 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

4:00pm EST

Building Stronger Bridges Between Collaborations
Data professionals who engage in CDI and ESIP Collaboration Areas have many mutual interests both in terms of technical topics and application areas. In an effort to increase communication between these groups, we will host a session to share and explore potential synergies. This session will make connections between people in both communities, bring to light lessons already learned or resources already produced, and help to identify common interests and challenges to collaborate on in the future. We will also explore mechanisms for continued sharing across ESIP, CDI, and other related groups going forward.

Organizers
avatar for Megan Carter

Megan Carter

Community Director, ESIP
avatar for Leslie Hsu

Leslie Hsu

Coordinator, Community for Data Integration, U.S. Geological Survey

Thursday January 20, 2022 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

4:00pm EST

Enhancing the Guidelines for Sharing and Reusing Dataset Information Quality
The ESIP Information Quality Cluster, collaborating with other groups from around the world, has led the formation the baselined International Community Guidelines for Sharing and Reusing Quality Information of Individual Earth Science Datasets (see https://doi.org/10.31219/osf.io/xsu4p). The baselined dataset quality guidelines offer an opportunity for improvement to serve multiple disciplines, use cases, and domains of applied sciences. In addition to the Earth sciences and related study areas, various disciplines and data types each need information about data quality when assessing data for potential reuse and when deciding how to use the data. For example, when studying climate change, environmental hazards, and other multidisciplinary issues, often, data from various disciplines are integrated. Such multidisciplinary data integration activities raise cross-disciplinary questions about the quality of individual datasets and approaches to fusing such cross-disciplinary quality information. Also, new questions about data quality emerge when planning to use the products and services that include datasets that have been integrated from various disciplines. Session participants will discuss use cases and data quality issues for interdisciplinary data (re)use and integration in terms of the implications for enhancing the dataset quality guidelines.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session: Identify data quality questions and issues of interest.

Organizers
avatar for Robert R. Downs

Robert R. Downs

Senior Digital Archivist, Columbia University
Dr. Robert R. Downs serves as the senior digital archivist and acting head of cyberinfrastructure and informatics research and development at CIESIN, the Center for International Earth Science Information Network, a research and data center of the Earth Institute of Columbia University... Read More →
avatar for David F. Moroni

David F. Moroni

Data Stewardship and User Services Team Lead, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center
I am a Senior Science Data Systems Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Data Stewardship and User Services Team Lead for the PO.DAAC Project, which provides users with data stewardship services including discovery, access, sub-setting, visualization, extraction, documentation... Read More →
avatar for Hampapuram K. Ramapriyan

Hampapuram K. Ramapriyan

Research Scientist, Subject Matter Expert, Science Systems and Applications, Inc.

Thursday January 20, 2022 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
TBA

4:00pm EST

Round the World Efforts to Improve the Discovery and Reusability of Education & Training Materials Data Skills Teachers & Learners Alike
As the world in which all people work and live becomes more data intensive, the need remains for data researchers, stewards, managers and users to discover and instructors to reuse education and training opportunities in order to further their formal and informal education and their professional development. New and existing education and training resources can help people achieve the skills and competencies necessary to compete and perform in their work and living environments. A number of organizations within the research data teaching and learning communities across many subject domains have been working hard to come up with ways to improve the chances for discovery of existing materials. These ways include recommendations for metadata and other documentation, the development of metadata application profiles and implementation testbeds. In addition, these organizations have identified some core characteristics that service providers who provide search and discovery services via catalogues, registries and portals can use to help them remain sustainable as project funding comes and goes, and education and training needs change. This session will cover some of the important recent developments that will hopefully, improve the discovery and reusability of learning resources, and platforms that service them.

Organizers
avatar for Nancy Hoebelheinrich

Nancy Hoebelheinrich

Principal, Knowledge Motifs LLC
See my LinkedIn profile at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nancy-hoebelheinrich-0576ba3

Speakers

Thursday January 20, 2022 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

4:00pm EST

Supporting User Contributed Annotations for Data Catalogues
This session will provide a point for discussion around the use of an external service (the Throughput Widget) to support metadata enhancement for data repositories. The Throughput Annotation Database is a service that connects data records, code repositories, publications and databases across the internet, using unique identifiers to link these elements. Throughput is searchable through an API and an online user interface that exposes these links. One key use case for Throughput is allowing users to indirectly annotate data records on the web through the Throughput Widget. This widget uses an individual’s ORCID as an identifier and allows them to associate a text annotation to a dataset or data element on an organization’s home page once that organization enables the widget.

Organizers
avatar for Simon Goring

Simon Goring

University of Wisconsin - Madison
Simon Going is an Assistant Scientist in the Department of Geography at the University of Wisconsin - Madison and the outgoing Co-Chair of the earthCube Engagement Team/representative on the Leadership Council.

Speakers

Thursday January 20, 2022 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout
 
Friday, January 21
 

11:00am EST

Better Science for Future Us: Planning for the Year of Open Science
This session will bring together a diverse set of leaders across the U.S. government to highlight open science contributions that support data generation to data use and understanding and to identify a common agenda that the collective is moving forward. We aim to support open practices and community building that accelerate data-driven solutions and increase diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging in science. We will lead a session of Appreciative Interviews (Liberating Structures) with teams from US government agencies that are working with Openscapes. Between interviews, participants will have time for “silent journaling” in a shared Google Doc, and we will facilitate a discussion based on participant ideas and questions.

Agenda draft: Liberating Structures Appreciative Interviews (AI)
Have teams share stories of what’s worked within their agency by doing appreciative interviews with each other, then group discusses how it can work cross-agency

10 min - Welcome, intro to open science approaches & goals, better science for future us
10 min - Openscapes AI (intro framework & champions)
10 min - NOAA AI (what champions has done, where the framework might go) - traditional champions that has expanded
10 min - EPA AI - what they learned from assisting NOAA - mentors intro
10 min - NASA AI (what the framework’s done for them) - more mentor development and expanding the Champions curriculum to include new material
10 min - silent journaling & discussion
What resonates that you could share with your community?
Goal: short stories that everyone can share out after session
20 min - Silent journaling & discussion
What is something that your community would need / what’s common?
Goal: distill common needs, next steps for the Year of Open Science
10 min - Cross-agency next steps

Recommended ways to prepare for this session: Review slides from a December 2021 AGU talk (will provide a link following the presentation).

Organizers
avatar for Julia Lowndes

Julia Lowndes

Senior Fellow, Openscapes Director, NCEAS, UC Santa Barbara
Julia Stewart Lowndes, PhD is a marine ecologist, data scientist, and Senior Fellow at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). As founding director of Openscapes (created during her Mozilla Fellowship) she champions kinder, better science in less time and... Read More →
avatar for Erin Robinson

Erin Robinson

Co-Founder & Leadership Coach, Metadata Game Changers LLC

Speakers

Friday January 21, 2022 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
TBA

11:00am EST

Developing author guidelines and recommendations for physical samples
This session is a working session of the Physical Samples Curation Cluster. During this session, we will report on related activities in other ESIP Clusters, updates from the relevant external Sample Communities and continue efforts from the Cluster monthly meetings.

To continue efforts from the monthly meetings, we will have focused discussions on the development of author guidelines and recommendations for samples for journals and publishers. Sample citation is a complex topic. While it is challenging, it is also crucial for making samples a part of the data ecosystem. Our aim is to improve the discoverability of samples in the future such that they can be used by all researchers, from sample generation to sample use and understanding.

The Physical Samples Curation Cluster is a forum for the community supporting physical samples in the earth, space, and environmental sciences which includes but is not limited to geological and biological samples. The cluster’s goal is to enhance discoverability, access, and use of sample collections.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session:
Review content from ESIP summer meeting 2021: Meeting notes - https://bit.ly/36VARj7 Session slides - https://bit.ly/3zbz4Cx Read through example documents: https://data.agu.org/resources/agu-data-software-sharing-guidance https://zenodo.org/record/5124741#.YXhxpZ7MLD4 Our draft: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1JnoWC9IE9r4LIa6mYeCjehuMJ6GARU3LDobpau9waz4/edit#heading=h.k7ajtid4jbww Cluster meeting notes document: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1xGYLWdtCYDz_KJ4JOeU1w0_gvjdAKCOLPT83h4yPmTU/edit

Organizers
SR

Sarah Ramdeen

Data Curator, Columbia University
avatar for Val Stanley

Val Stanley

Antarctic Core Curator, Oregon State University

Friday January 21, 2022 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

11:00am EST

Global ARD to Local DRI: Decisive Recipes for Disasters
We will share with the ESIP community concepts, tools, and outcomes from the OGC Disaster Pilot 2021. We will also invite ESIP members to try out some of these capabilities such as Jupyter Notebooks for creating and visualizing Decision Ready Indicators from Analysis Ready Data, automated multilingual audio survey apps for local disaster reporting, transportation impact models, and/or other systems developed by Pilot participants.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session: Links to material from the Indicator Workshop at the past Summer Meeting and a subsequent Readiness Workshop will help attendees to hit the screen running (link to be provided).

Organizers
Friday January 21, 2022 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

11:00am EST

Wikidata: A knowledge graph for the earth sciences?
Wikidata has become a central hub for life science related knowledge and data that conforms to the FAIR principles of findability, accessibility, interoperability and reusability as outlined in the influential “Science Forum: Wikidata as a knowledge graph for the life sciences(https://elifesciences.org/articles/52614).” Using this work on the life sciences topic as a model, how can the earth sciences leverage this large, multinational, accessible, sustainable community resource to improve science and applications related to earth science data? One example comes from Environment Canada which has imported metadata from 8,754 Meteorological Service of Canada stations into wikidata which is now queryable from the wikidata query service SPARQL endpoint (https://w.wiki/4LTi). Given that Wikidata represents a diverse, international data community whose work is built on semantic principles, it has the potential to enhance earth science data access for all people and provides inherent formal semantics, provenance and quality refinement mechanisms that enhance data usability, reliability and understanding.

Recommended ways to prepare for this session: Reading Science Forum: Wikidata as a knowledge graph for the life sciences(https://elifesciences.org/articles/52614) may be beneficial to understand how the life sciences have utilized wikidata.

Organizers
avatar for Gary Berg-Cross

Gary Berg-Cross

Consultant, Ontolog Board Member
Cognitive Psychologist and long-time data and knowledge engineer. Board member of the Ontolog Forum. Activities including hosting VoCamps to develop modular ontologies and harmonize semantics between terminologies, conceptual models and ontologies.
JW

Jane Wyngaard

University of Notre Dame

Friday January 21, 2022 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
TBA
  Breakout, Breakout

12:30pm EST

Break
Friday January 21, 2022 12:30pm - 1:30pm EST
TBA

1:30pm EST